Bollywood on the Great Barrier Reef


This is a great little video filmed on location at Green Island by Sea Walker. Seawalker (Great Barrier Reef, Cairns, Australia) wins the first ever Tourism Tropical North Queensland ‘So you think you can Bollywood’ dance competition with this over the top or under water film….

Production Notes From Karl of Seawalker,

G’Day!,

I wanted to send a big thank you to all at TTNQ for allowing us to participate in the Bollywood competition, and letting us enter a video production.

It was a great experience for the crew of Sea Walker,and i must say we had a great time on Green Island filming the dance.

It’s a very unusual experience trying to dance underwater in a helmet, as all you hear is bubbles, No music and your self counting out the moves in a 4/4 count just hoping that every one around you are in time.

Thus about 15 takes to get it right.

The response from people on the night was fantastic,and we had a really great time too.

So once again , a big thank you to all.

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Enjoying Your Reef Dive & Snorkel


Understanding the reef and the ecosystem that it is part of brings a much better fulfillment to each dive or snorkel that you partake in.  Every reef is slightly different and the marine life and coral formations can vary a great deal with reefs just a few miles apart. Going with an operator that knows the reef and the ecosystem is a definite pre-requisite to getting the most out of every time you hit the water.

Beautiful Coral Gardens on the Great Barrier Reef

A basic understanding the life-cycle of a coral reef helps you understand what you are seeing take place in front of your eyes. Coral form in different ways in different parts of the world and each location may have it’s peculiarities due to tides, currents, temperatures and a myriad of other factors. So it is best to dive with a local expert and someone who cares about the reef that you are diving. There are plenty of predators and destructive forces that prey upon the corals that make up the beautiful underwater landscape. This is a natural part of the life-cycle of a reef and is why you will see parts that appear dead or like rubble. The healthier the reef, the higher the percentage of coverage of coral, however there always needs to be some areas that are not covered so new corals can take hold and grow as part of the reef. Much like a tree needs a break in the forest to get sunlight to grow, often a larger tree must die and fall for this to happen and the life-cycle to continue.
The fish, turtles, sharks, starfish, rays and other marine life that surround reefs are also part of the balanced ecosystem. Local knowledge and educated staff can tell you the role each of them play. Are they are predator? Do they eat algae? Do they eat the coral? Do they filter water? Each of them have their special place in the ecosystem. This balance needs to be maintained to keep the worlds’ reefs healthy and vibrant for the next generation. The healthier the reef the more resistant it is to any disease or adverse impact it may suffer. Feeding fish while it may make your dive or snorkel more exciting as after periods of time marine life will flock to the area, it upset the balance that the reef has taken generations to reach.
So on your next trip study a bit before you go and learn about the area and ecosystem you are about to visit.  You may even learn something the local expert has yet to discover. Then choose the tour carefully to make sure you get the most you can out of your experience.

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What a Great Year on the Great Barrier Reef


This year continues to be a fantastic year on the Great Barrier Reef with fantastic weather and great spectacles on show for the world to see on a regular basis. Lighter winds and calm seas for the most part this year have made diving and snorkeling on the outer reef defy the imagination with awesome visibility and active marine life.
Our guests on the extended private yacht charters earlier in the year got to enjoy some of the reefs that are rarely visited and some of the small uninhabited islands that dot the Great Barrier Reef. Dolphins seem to have adopted the bows of our yachts as a playground to surf the waves.
The reef surveys again were carried out by Reefcheck Australia, and continue to show the health and resilience of the reef with positive growth being shown across our dive sites.
We were privileged in June and July with regular Minke Whale visits around the reefs and now the humpback whales are continuing the show. The whales head north for the warm sun and calm seas of the tropics. These Humpback Whales are often seen enjoying their annual winter break from the cold water of the southern states. Whales playfully basking and breaching make a common and spectacular sight sailing to and from the reef.
All the while many of the seabirds that form an important part of the ecosystems are seen continually scann the water surface and then diving from great heights to secure their meals.
Our regular cast of characters such as Wally the Maori Wrasse, “nemo” (clownfish), turtles and many other beautiful fish and reef formations continue to keep us entertained and in awe of the wonder that is Great Barrier Reef. What a privilege to work and live around one the true natural wonders of the world.

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Why are fish so brightly coloured?


‘Why are fish so brightly coloured?’ This is one of the questions most commonly asked by our guests.
Reef fish are able to see colour. Their bright colours are important in species recognition and in the determination of sex. Some species, such as angelfish, have juvenile patterns that are totally different to the adults. The different colour patterns of juveniles may prevent adults from seeing them as a potential threat to territories or as reproductive partners. They also use their colours to blend with the environment is an import way to ambush prey and to hide from predators.

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